Teaching Research Methods to encourage the transition from ‘reluctant scientist’ to psychologist: A longitudinal study

Robertson, Julia M and Kingsley, Barbara E (2015) Teaching Research Methods to encourage the transition from ‘reluctant scientist’ to psychologist: A longitudinal study. Psychology Teaching Review, 21 (1). pp. 44-55. ISSN 0965-948X

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Abstract

The challenge of teaching Research Methods to frequently unwilling undergraduate psychologists has long been recognised. Whilst a number of studies have sought to investigate and address the barriers to its effective teaching, few have taken a quantitative approach and fewer still a longitudinal design in order to examine the efficacy of specified interventions. This study employed such a design, the sample consisting of three cohorts of first-year psychology students (N=286) over three consecutive years who were undertaking Research Methods as a compulsory module. Changes were implemented in both the delivery and assessment regime to facilitate a more engaging delivery of the material and greater consolidation of basic principles though iterative classroom techniques and the use of formative and summative assessments. A significant improvement in student marks, despite an increase in the difficulty of the assessments, was found with overall marks increasing by a whole grade band. Further analysis of the different assessed elements of the yearlong module also demonstrated improved performance in each of the constituent parts. This study, therefore, extends the growing body of evidence-based literature on the use of effective teaching techniques and assessment regimes in a challenging area.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Research Methods, Assessment, Teaching, Pedagogy.
Depositing User: J McPeak
Date Deposited: 23 Mar 2017 14:29
Last Modified: 13 Jun 2018 11:24
URI: http://bucks.repository.guildhe.ac.uk/id/eprint/15477

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